Deep Tissue Massage

Ease your cold and achy muscles with a deep tissue massage.

At this time of year most of us start to feel a few more aches and pains in our bodies. The cold is starting to have an affect. We are less active and spend more time indoors.

The time we do spend outside, we are often hunched over sheltering from the wind or rain, wrapped up in layers that are heavy and make us feel restricted in our movement.

Cold weather results in less blood supply to the extremities in order to preserve body heat in the core of the torso and head. This reduction in blood flow could be one reason for us feeling more achy.

Dr. James Gladstone, co-director of sports medicine at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, told weather.com. “All of those tissues have nerve endings in them, so they’re going to feel changes in the weather as tightness in the joint, or stiffness.” “Anything cold causes muscles, ligaments and tendons to sort of tighten up, and that makes them stiffer.” 

He added. ” If you’re going to be doing stuff in cold weather, you want to make sure you warm up well first, and as importantly, have protective clothing on, so you don’t get too cold.”

So, how can deep tissue massage help? Improved blood circulation is just one of the benefits of massage therapy. Combined with a balanced diet and regular exercise, massage can be a powerful, natural ally for a healthier lifestyle.

Massage facilitates circulation because the pressure created by the massage technique actually moves blood through the congested areas. The release of this same pressure causes new blood to flow in. The squeezing and pulling also flushes lactic acid from the muscles and improves the circulation of the lymph fluid which carries metabolic waste away from muscles and internal organs, as well as this being able to help with aches and pains from the cold it also resulting in lower blood pressure* and improved body function.

So if you are feeling a bit achey from the cold, you could do well to book yourself in for a deep tissue massage to ease your aches and pains.

*A study published in 2008 in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine involved 263 participants who reported muscle spasm or strain. Each individual’s blood pressure and heart rate was assessed prior to a 45 to 60-minute deep tissue massage, as well as after. The result was lower systolic and diastolic pressure, as well as heart rates around 10 beats less per minute.